Engineering longer lasting artificial joints

BioTrib: The international collaboration, led by the University of Leeds and funded by the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme, will focus on improved design and testing to reduce incidence of implant failure, faults, and other orthopedic complications

The BioTrib ETN project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 956004
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Presently, up to a third of some types of artificial joints fail within ten years.

Engineers believe problems have arisen with some implants because of weaknesses in the way they were tested prior to being approved for use. Current testing fails to evaluate real-world wear and tear.

£4 million in EU funding

The BioTrib European Training Network project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 956004

5 Universities

The BioTrib teams comprises 5 Beneficiaries from the UK and, Sweden, and Switzerland together with 11 partners from across the globe, including organisations in Australia and China

15 Early Stage Researchers

15 ESR projects reflecting both the underpinning fundamental engineering science and the application through the incorporation of new materials, techniques and assessment methods

Research Showcase: Ada Lovelace

Celebrating women in STEM and their contributions to range of cutting edge research and innovation from Emmy Noether, whose theorem provides a link between symmetry and conservation laws, to Professor Gilbert who holds the Saïd Professorship of Vaccinology and is the lead developer of the Oxford AZ Vaccine. Read more on the contribution of early stage female researchers to current challenges in healthcare technology in the link below – a resource developed the early stage researchers at the Nu-Spine ETN.

Nu-Spine Female Early Stage Researchers at Uppsala University, ETH Zurich and University of Leeds.

UKRI Reviews of Doctoral Training – The Good and Some Cause for Concern

The UKRI, the overarching government body that manages publicly funded research and innovation in the UK, has just published two reports on doctoral training one in STEM (the EPSRC report) and one by the equivalent in social sciences (the ESRC report). Both reports recognise the value of doctoral training with an emphasis on employers rather…

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Nasal chondrocytes as a potential alternative for tissue-engineered replacements for osteoarthritic joints

According to a recent study published in Nature, nasal-tissue engineered chondrocytes showed promising preclinical results to treat knee arthroplasty in osteoarthritic conditions. According to the authors, the in vitro exposition to inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1𝛽, TNF) did not imply articular cartilage phenotype loss. Successful tests were currently conducted in animals (mice) showing integration with the…

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Kartogenin – a promising drug for cartilage regeneration.

Kartogenin (KGN) is a small, non-toxic, heterocyclic molecule, it has been known for effectively enhancing the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow MSC (hBMSC), for exhibiting chondroprotective effects in vitro and for reducing cartilage degeneration [1]. KGN interacts with the actin-binding protein filamin A, disrupting its balance with the transcription factor core-binding factor β (CBFβ),…

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